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Men in College

Men in College

Are college institutions practicing affirmative action for boys, if so why? Sarah Karnasiewicz is a writer and editor for Salon. com’s Life section. She has written most of her articles on education and youth culture. In her article, “The Campus Crusade for Guys,” she explores the gender gap between males and females applications for college admission. The question of whether affirmative action for boys has begun. Karnasiewicz begins her article by presenting the opinion of child psychologist and advocate for boys, Michael Thompson.

Thompson’s response, “I would be horrified if some lunkhead boy got accepted to a school instead of my very talented and prepared daughter just because he happened to be a guy” (909). Karnasiewicz continues her article with the current statistics of a gender gap ration of 43-57 male to female (909). Her thesis states that educators are asking if affirmative action for boys needs to begin (909). Karnasiewicz gives a background of the press that this subject is receiving.

She points out that there are some administrators that are stating that affirmative action for boys is being practiced but the case brought up against the University of Georgia drove the practice underground. The other main points that she discusses to support her thesis is what institutions are doing to increase male applications, reasons why the gender gap ratio is in favor for women and what consequences to having a higher female application pool will have. Evaluation of this article shows organization that clearly speaks to the audience, use of credible evidence and an appeal to a parental audience.

Karnasiewicz state a specific claim. Her thesis states “Amid national panic over a growing academic gender gap, educators have begun to ask, might it be time to adopt affirmative action for boys? She clearly states in the beginning of her article the statistics that show a gender gap ratio is in favor for women and what consequences to having a higher female application pool will have. Evaluation of this article shows organization that clearly speaks to the audience, use of credible evidence and an appeal to a parental audience. Karnasiewicz state a specific claim.

Her thesis states “Amid national panic over a growing academic gender gap, educators have begun to ask, might it be time to adopt affirmative action for boys? She clearly states in the beginning of her article the statistics that show a gender gap ratio that favors female applications to colleges. Karnasiewicz states, “Thirty-five years ago, in the early days of coeducation, the gender ratio on campuses averaged 43-57, female to male. The ratios now are inverted” (909). Karnasiewicz also mentions that women not only have more applications to school, but follow through to graduation.

As she progresses to state her claim, the article presents information clearly and flows easily for the reader to follow her ideas. Karnasiewicz uses credible evidence such as scholarly sources to support her claim. An example of a scholarly sourced used is a story written in Newsweek. Karnasiewicz writes, “Newsweek joined the fray with an eight-page cover story by Peg Tyre, breathlessly captioned “The Boy Crisis,” and laden with oversize color photos of doleful white boys, seemingly adrift in a sea of competent, well-adjusted girls”. (910) another example of how Karnasiewicz used credible evidence is using a quote from Tom Mortenson.

Karnasiewicz writes “Mortenson, senior policy analyst at the Pell Institute for Opportunity in Higher Education and creator of the Postsecondary Education Opportunity Newsletter, agrees that a better qualified female may not have been accepted into a school because the admission office may have been trying to even the ratio”. (910). The author continues by quoting Mortenson, “ I know [affirmative action for boys] is being practiced, especially on liberal arts campuses where the gap is biggest because I’ve had administrators tell me so” (910). Karnasiewicz writes this article using an emotional appeal to parents.

As mentioned earlier in this evaluation, she begins her article with the appeal from child psychologist, Michael Thompson. The statement by Thompson, “I would be horrified if some lunkhead boy got accepted to a school instead of my very talented and prepared daughter just because he happened to be a guy” (909), appeals to parents who have daughters. The practice of accepting a student just because they are male would warrant investigating the schools that your daughter would like to apply to. In conclusion, Karnasiewicz wrote a well-informed, organized article.

I found it interesting to read because me being a guy I would not want to get accepted into a college over a very well educated female, just because I’m a guy, and not because how smart I am. I agree with Thompson. I would be upset if I was accepted over a smart female because of gender preference. In the next ten years it will be interesting to see what the gender gap ratio will be. I believe that in the future gender will not be the only factor that affects applications to college. The economy will definitely affect the decision to apply to college.