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Soccer Development

Soccer Development

SASKATCHEWAN SASKATCHEWAN SOCCER ASSOCIATION TECHNICAL DEPARTMENT Regional Training Centre National Training Centre 2011/2012 Prepared by: Terrol Russell Director, RTC – Saskatchewan Staff Coach, NTC – Prairies Regional Training Centre – Saskatchewan: Saskatoon, Regina National Training Centre – Prairies: Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1. 0 2. 0 3. 0 4. 0 5. 0 6. 0 7. 0 8. 0 9. 0 10. 0 11. RTC-SK/NTC-Prairies Program Outline 2011-2012 SSA Player Development Pathway RTC-SK Coaching Philosophy Organizational Excellence RTC-SK Training Theory RTC-SK LTPD Stage-Based Training Content RTC-SK Sports Science Integration RTC-SK Physical Testing Dates and Protocol RTC-SK Training Schedule NTC-Prairies Scouting Dates Appreciation Page 3 4 5 6 8 11 12 15 16 21 21 2 1. 0 – RTC-SK/NTC-P Program Outline 2011-2012 For the purposes of identifying players for our National Youth Teams Program, the Canadian Soccer Association has established five National Training Centres across Canada.

The Prairie Provinces are served by the National Training Centre – Prairies (NTC-P) in Edmonton and directed by CSA Men? s U-17 Head Coach Sean Fleming. Locally players are selected to train in the Regional Training Centre – Saskatchewan (RTC-SK). The purpose of the RTCSK is to develop players who have the potential to eventually be selected for involvement in the NTC-P, National Youth Teams Programs, Professional Club Environments, and Post Secondary Programs. Over the past three years a shift in training philosophy has transpired in the RTC-SK program. New coaching echniques and methods of learning have been implemented and a focus on relationship building with the Districts, Clubs/Zones and Technical Directors is one of the core program principles. Promotion of a development-first approach is in the best interest of Saskatchewan athletes and is quickly becoming a key directive of soccer stakeholders Province-wide. Integration of the three pillars of long term sustainability, recruitment, retainment, and development drives our program and has helped remove the results-based approach that impedes player-development.

The RTC-SK is designed to be a platinum-level training environment; providing identified Saskatchewan athletes the opportunity to compete on a more equitable level to other high-performance athletes across the country. As of October 31, 2011 the RTC-SK will evolve into a full-time indoor after school program. Separate development plans have been created for our Training to Train (T2T) and Training to Compete (T2C) athletes, who will be scheduled for on-field training three and five days a week respectively.

Funding has been concentrated into one environment and having transitioned into fulltime training status, Saskatoon will now act as the core training base for high-performance RTC-SK programming. Identified athletes throughout the Province will be provided the opportunity to relocate during the training season and participate in the core training environment or participate in local training environments sanctioned as a Centre of Excellence. This is to ensure all identified athletes are challenging and provide a high competition level.

Athletes training within the RTC-SK will now be referred to as apprentices because part of the purpose of the program is to develop students of the game. In response to the increased time demand and specialized training methods the RTCSK will provide, apprentices will be required to provide a full physical and psychological commitment to the program. Due to their positioning within the growth and maturation paradigm, T2T apprentices will be supported and encouraged to acquire movement skills within non-soccer specific environments.

Once an apprentice enters the T2C program however an increased commitment to soccer specific training will be expected. The RTC-SK coaching staff will be tasked with ensuring each apprentice, regardless of program level, is provided the necessary tools to achieve their dreams and goals. A substantial increase in services will be provided for our identified athletes during the upcoming season. Although a high percentage of these program services are subsidized through external funding, all external funding will be used to support on-field technical training and SAQ training sessions.

As such, a minimum of one set and maximum of five sets of the designated RTC-SK program training kit (t-shirt, shorts, socks) will be required to be purchased by each participant, prior to the initial on-field training session (approximate cost per set of kit is $40). Additionally a monthly fee will be required to participate, $70 for T2T athletes and $110 for T2C athletes; program fees will be due at the beginning of each month. Should you have any questions or concerns please contact me at (306) 975-0826 or t. [email protected] com to discuss further. Sincerely, Terrol Russell Coordinator of High Performance Programs Saskatchewan Soccer Association 3 2. 0 – SSA Player Development Pathway The Canadian Soccer Association recently introduced the Long Term Player Development (LTPD) model: Wellness to World Cup, setting the following goals: 1. 2. 3. 4. Promote lifelong enjoyment of physical activity. Provide structured player development pathway. Describe best practices for elite player development.

Create long-term excellence. These LTPD goals have become the driving force behind changes currently undertaken within Saskatchewan regarding player development. In accordance with LTPD the Saskatchewan Soccer Association Player Development Pathway is outlined below. More information on the Player Development Pathway is available in the Technical Development Plan and “System Saskatchewan” document, both available on the Sask Soccer website (www. asksoccer. com). PTP = Provincial Teams Program PSL = Premier Soccer League NTC = National Training Centre RTC = Regional Training Centre 4 3. 0 – RTC-SK Coaching Philosophy “They [athletes] forget what you say to them, they forget what you do with them, but they never forget how you make them feel! ” Paul Barron The purpose of the RTC-SK is to aid apprentices in acquiring the tools and experience necessary for achieving their soccer goals.

To accomplish this purpose the coaching and management staff is tasked with helping each apprentice develop their sport specific and athlete-specific High-Performance skills. Sport specific development includes engendering technical ability that allows for play on the square inch, creating tactical/spatial awareness so each apprentice understands positional responsibility both on and off the ball, and building the mental strength/toughness required in gaining that extra edge over others in practice, competition and in all walks of life.

Athlete-specific development includes but is not limited to: physical conditioning, physiological development through the usage of work-rest ratios that labor specific energy systems, formation of neurophysiological connections that produce an end result with maximum certainty and a minimum outlay of time and energy, psychological tools including goal-setting, visualization and self-talk, and social skills that facilitate interaction and communication with others.

Resulting from the evolving coach-player relationship, a key component of the RTC-SK program is to maintain a coaching staff that – enthuses, involves, and engages the apprentice throughout their soccer journey. Developing athletes through the use of external motivation and using authority to impose hierarchical views on every situation is in direct contrast to the coaching philosophy of the RTC-SK program. Autonomy promotion through the use of guided discovery and the RTCSK core developmental philosophy, mistake based learning; athletes are presented with problems and guided to discover the optimal solution.

Athlete Performance is in direct correlation to attitude, for that reason the RTC-SK coaching staff continually stresses the small but vital details and coach attitude alongside talent. Outward behavior (character, conduct) and physical cues (appearance, body language) presented by staff can dictate the training attitude of apprentices; this is a result of developing athletes shaping their behavior after those they maintain a high regard for.

RTC-SK coaching staff focuses on teaching the athletes to create habits out of the simple things and in the critical moments of the game. This includes: The coaches challenging the apprentices to train and play on their technical and tactical edge. Encourage the apprentices to challenge themselves and strive to raise their level of mediocrity. Build an internal driven force whereby the apprentices naturally challenge each other daily. Develop relationships that involve the apprentices having an ownership stake in the process. Today? generation of apprentices has been reported to be much more difficult to engage and teach; this is due to many varying cultural and societal reasons. To overcome this coaching within the RTC-SK program has become an environment of shared ownership, responsibility and accountability. The teaching curriculum is strictly athlete-centred, which is in contrast to the classical results-based environment. This is supported with coaching styles directed more towards personal involvement and internal motivation than yelling and achieving results through external motivational factors.

RTC-SK coaches establish an environment where the program framework is set, training and behavioral standards are imposed, apprentices are monitored and continually provided feedback, and the responsibility of learning is accepted by the apprentices as normal behavior. Ten key strategies to coaching success as detailed by Mr. Bill Beswick: “Behaviour = Personality x Environment”. 1. Communicate more – this includes listening – with each player and not just the stars 2. Build an ongoing relationship with each player; appreciate individual feelings and assess mood. 3. Understand each player? personality and the best approaches for a positive response. 4. Be the model every day for the attitude and behavior you wish the players to follow. 5. Sell more and yell less; players need to be engaged and willing before they commit. 6. Share ownership of the journey; it? s about where the players want to go. 7. Make the player? s significant family and friends part of the solution, not the problem. 8. Create a motivational coaching environment where players are challenged but always enjoy their soccer. 9. Develop a range of coaching strategies that can change a player? s or team? s attitude from negative to positive. 10.

Create emotional stability – a defeat is only an opportunity lost! Learn but move on. 5 4. 0 – Organizational Excellence “Landing on your butt twenty-thousand times is where great performance comes from. ” Geoff Colvin discussing Shizuka Arakawa – 2006 Olympic Figure Skating Champion “No time plus no space equals better skills. Futsal is our national laboratory of improvisation. ” Dr. Miranda – professor of soccer at the University of Sao Paulo. Skill Development During the RTC-SK training season T2T apprentices are provided two on-field technical training sessions and a single speed, agility, quickness (SAQ) session weekly.

T2C apprentices will add an additional technical training session and an additional SAQ session to their schedule, resulting in five weekly training sessions. The program focus is player-centred which contrasts the traditional team-centred approach. Throughout the Five month program technical development will be advanced through the use of guided discovery. With this technique apprentices are empowered to discover on their own and taught to solve problems through guided questioning. Problems will vary in complexity and accompany the „competitive cauldron? raining environment, which challenges apprentices to make decisions under pressure. The sixteen core RTC-SK training philosophies. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Discover sporting talent focused ruthlessly on soccer and nurture their desire with quality coaching. Provide deliberate, purposeful and complex practice environments. Provide development opportunity to identified athletes regardless of physical maturation rate. Teach how to read patterns of movement, interpret visual cues and anticipate? Aid in the development of motor system control and the timing of fine and gross motor movement.

Encourage apprentices to make plenty of mistakes, while on the road to skill mastery. Train on the technical and tactical edge every session. Develop unwavering perfectly reproducible technique that allows for noiseless feedback. Discourage blame or focusing on “failures”, instead apprentices will learn to value mistakes. Apprentices will be permitted to have an opinion and have the freedom to philosophize about the game. Internalize motivation and care about the destination. Engender and reinforce the growth mindset. Effort-based praise will only be provided. Coaches will organize practice to optimize learning.

Coaches will maintain and set high training expectations. Coaches will be mentors, not instructors. Conduct and Discipline If selected to the Saskatchewan RTC program each apprentice is expected to maintain a high level of conduct and possess a professional attitude. Attitude is defined through the commitment, passion, determination, and discipline displayed during all training sessions. Positive playing habits as evidenced through body language are the expected norm part of your training personality. 1. All RTC apprentices will maintain a professional standard at training sessions and at all soccer activities 2.

If an apprentice resigns from the RTC program it is asked that a written document be submitted to the Saskatchewan Soccer Association High Performance Coordinator. 3. All RTC apprentices are expected to be punctual for all training sessions and meetings. If an apprentice will be absent it is their responsibility to provide written (email) notification to the HPC 24 hours in advance. All apprentices will be provided with a single unexcused absence. If a second unexcused absence occurs continued program participation will be discussed. 4.

Athletes are not obligated to utilize the services of a Saskatchewan Sports Medicine and Science Council Sport Therapist. If however a member of the list in chapter 8 is utilized, the assessment fee will be covered by the Saskatchewan Sports Medicine council. 6 5. Athletes identified for the NTC-P are required to achieve and maintain a year round fitness regimen. Physical fitness testing sessions will be held regularly during the RTC season and conducted by members of the SaskSoccer Sports Science Team. 6. When attending an RTC training session apprentices are required to wear the designated and supplied apparel.

Athletes must take pride in their appearance as it will prepare you for the NTC environment, where National Team coaches will be in attendance. 7. Shirts must be kept clean and intact (i. e. no tears) at all times Long hair is to be tied in a pony tail Track suits are to be worn properly; bottoms and tops zipped. Shorts may not be rolled up All jewelry is to be removed prior to training Fingernails are to be trimmed Apprentices are required to maintain two pairs of soccer boots (flats, turf or multi stud); blades are not permitted during training sessions on turf due to the increased possibility of injury.

All training bags should maintain all necessary equipment for all training environments 8. All disciplinary action will be handled through the RTC-SK Director Terrol Russell. 7 5. 0 – RTC-SK Training Theory Mistake based training environment (Based on research by Coyle) “Try again. Fail again. Fail Better”. Samuel Beckett “I’ve, missed more than nine thousand shots. I’ve lost almost three hundred games. Twenty-six times I’ve been trusted to take the game-winning shot and missed? ” Michael Jordan “If I find 10,000 ways something won’t work, I haven’t failed.

I am not discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward. ” Thomas Edison A) Deep Practice – Training at the edge of your capabilities, on your technical and tactical edge. Training consistently in this zone leads to the development of many mistakes. This is due to being asked to produce and perform at levels in which the athlete is not comfortable. With each mistake additional myelin is being produced and insulating neural circuits. With each new myelin sheath the electrical signals sent from the brain to the muscles are faster and more effective.

Deep practice is developed in an environment that supports risk-taking and experimentation and more importantly, demands athletes to generate solutions to problems. B) Ignition – The motivational fuel that generates that energy, passion, and commitment to deep practice; the ability to partake in deep practice for 10,000 hours and operate at the edge of your capabilities. Research by Dweck shows when individuals are praised for their intelligence they become reluctant to tackle difficult tasks and their performance on subsequent tests suffer.

To counter this effect Coyle has found that what “ignites” people is “effort based praise” which “nourishes the roots of deep practice”. C) Master Coaching – Master Coaches ignite passion and commitment in their athletes. They need to be “strategically impatient” and always tinkering to determine the best method of motivating an athlete to train on their technical and tactical edge. Verbal cues are brief and highly specific because the master coach listens more than they talk; this creates the active learning environment. The Mindset of a Champion (Based on research by Dweck)

According to Dweck individuals maintain either a growth mindset or a fixed mindset. The differentiation between the two mindsets is that in a fixed mindset outcome reigns and if not the best, all the work and training has been for not. In a growth mindset however individuals value the effort and do not dwell on the result; the search and the path is deeply meaningful. Research has discovered praise should be given to effort and persistence rather than intelligence or talent. In the RTC-SK the approach will be to teach athletes to crave challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, celebrate their efforts, and to never stop learning. Mindset is more important than talent”. Billy Beane “The mark of a champion is the ability to win when things are not quite right – when you’re not playing well and your emotions are not the right ones”. Billie Jean King “The most important thing for a soccer player to have…Mental Toughness”. Mia Hamm “I believe ability can get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there”. John Wooden “Success is about being your best self, not about being better than others; failure is an opportunity, not a condemnation; effort is the key to success”. Carol Dweck

Challenges Obstacles Effort Criticism Success of Others Result Fixed Mindset Avoids challenges Gives up easily Sees effort as fruitless Ignores useful negative feedback Feels threatened by the success of others Plateaus early and achieves less than full potential Growth Mindset Embraces Challenges Persists in the face of setbacks Sees effort as the path to mastery Learns from Finds lessons and inspiration in the success of others Reaches ever higher levels of achievement 8 Igniting a Training Hotbed (Based on KIPP school talent hotbed culture and Lessons from the great John Wooden) “Work Hard, Be Nice”.

KIPP school slogan “Every detail matters”. John Wooden “If we’re in a nice, easy, pleasant environment, we naturally shut-off effort. Why work? But if people get the signal that it’s rough, they get motivated now”. John Bargh The goal of the RTC-SK program is to provide soccer apprentices with the tools to attain an invite to the NTC-P, National team camp, Professional Club, or to be the recipient of a Post-Secondary scholarship. Basis for the RTC-SK training culture stems from lessons learned through the KIPP School and John Wooden (legendary UCLA Basketball coach).

Consistent messages that are repeated in each of these environments include A) Be absent of a fear of failure B) Maintain a confidence but dispel any hint of arrogance C) Attention to detail separates mediocrity from those who conduct a daily fight for their success D) Success is not defined by your total number of victories or medals, but by a self-satisfaction and peace of mind. Within the RTC-SK program our apprentices will base their training conduct on the previous points and immerse themselves in an environment defined by committed and deliberate practice.

Deliberate Practice being defined by Ericsson as continual work on technique, seeking of constant critical feedback, and ruthless attention towards all weaknesses. The Biopsychosocial Approach to Autonomy Development [in Athletes] (Based on research on selfmotivation by Edward L. Deci) “The most effective, autonomy supportive managers and teachers allow their workers or students to play a role in decision making”. Edward L. Deci “I you show me I will see, if you tell me I will hear, if you involve me I will understand”.

Unknown As a coach it is very important to support autonomy development in athletes for if people are controlled enough, they may eventually begin to act as though they want to be controlled. As coaches we need to work towards the promotion of autonomy, in part by providing athletes with guided choice. This is in response to research showing that when people are less autonomous due to a controlling environment, there is an increased chance said individual(s) will engage in negative behaviors.

An environment focused on autonomy development develops athletes who are more likely to adopt a healthy lifestyle and be more able to modify negative habits and behaviors. Elevated self esteem, positive mental health and selfactualization also result from an autonomy supportive environment and work to become more proactive in making choices that support them in achieving their dreams and goals. Athletes will be supported in their quest but external motivational techniques will not be used; instead motivation must come from internal mechanisms.

Apprentices must be prepared to take a dedicated interest in their development and be willing to compete on their technical and tactical edge every day. Only by our apprentices learning to accept responsibility for their own development will substantial progress result. RTC-SK – Vision and Decision Training (Based on Neurophysiological Principles) “The good players always want the ball. ” Hassann Nazari “Without them [athletes] having the knowledge of understanding of why, how, and where to move, players will be lost as they progress through the levels and their soccer future will be severely hindered. Steve Crane All movement on the soccer pitch is in reaction to visual cues received from the environment. Achieving success at the high-performance level is therefore essential to challenge the decision making and visual processes. By varying environmental complexity an athlete? s ability to pick up visual cues, anticipate, process the information and respond accordingly is consistently refined. Historically athletes have been taught in a linear manner; the concern is linear practice creates a linear athlete.

Athletes who are unable to combine environmental cues with resultant mental and physical processes have a tendency to operate within one thought or action at a time. These same athletes also have a tendency to get caught in possession of the ball and/or caught out of position. Cues athletes will be educated to focus on are the location of the ball (what), team in possession of the ball (who), vicinity of the pitch in which play is occurring (where), st nd location of teammates and opposition players, and match state, which encompasses temporal period (i. e. 1 half, 2 half) (when) and score (i. . ahead, behind, tied). Guidance will then include installation of the mechanisms by which the athlete can decide why and the how they will respond? 9 RTC-SK – Citadel of Excellence (Based on the Bollettieri philosophy of the quality of excellence) “I don’t believe skill was, or ever will be, the result of coaches. It is the result of a love affair between the child and the ball. ” Manfred Schellscheidt “Every endeavor pursued with passion produces a successful outcome regardless of the result. For it is not about winning or losing – rather, the effort put forth in producing the outcome.

The best way to predict the future is to create it – therefore, we believe we have the best training methods to help each athlete achieve their dreams and goals and ultimately reach their ability in the arena of sports and life. ” Nick Bollettieri? s published creed, signed by all residents entering his tennis academy. As reported by Syed, the Bollettieri academy sets itself apart from other training environments by the quality of the training attitude. The athletes “train with devotion; undertake physical training as if it was a privilege, not a chore; they eat food like it is fuel. ” Bollettieri praises effort and stresses hard work.

Praising for talent is not in his repertoire and states “they [athletes] may arrive thinking they can cruise their way to success, but they quickly learn that nobody has got anywhere in life without working hard, by showing tremendous discipline, and by taking responsibility for their actions. That is what ultimately separates the best from the rest. ” Mistakes are not a perceived as a negative but instead seen as a learning opportunity on how to respond and continually improve. In this and other environments like it, sporting excellence and the growth-mindset is entrenched in the cultural foundation.

Stated by Peter Keen, “I am convinced that world-class performance emerges from mind-set”. In the RTC-SK environment failure will be seen as an opportunity to learn, grow and solidify the growth-mindset. Each athlete with be imbued with the task of taking personal responsibility for their development. 10 6. 0 – RTC-SK LTPD Stage-Based Training Content The 10 S? s of training and performance (Wellness to World Cup, Volume 2) 1. Stamina (endurance) – Introduction to training stamina begins at the onset of Peak Height Velocity. 2. Strength – focusing on the sensitive period of trainability for strength. 3.

Speed – focusing on the sensitive period of trainability for speed. 4. Skill – learning physical literacy during the “skill hungry years”. 5. Suppleness – focusing on the sensitive period of trainability for suppleness. 6. Psychology – developing the ability to maintain high levels of concentration. 7. Structure/Stature – tracking stature before, during, and after maturation to help track developmental age. 8. Sustenance – addressing all off-field areas needed to optimize training (ex. Sleep, nutrition). 9. Schooling – consideration of academic loads and exams. 10. Socio-Cultural – broaden the sociocultural perspective of the athlete

Training to Train Three Key Program Guidelines Technical/Tactical – Introduction to mistake based learning -Individual refining of technique – Technical efficiency in tight areas – increase in Speed of Play and decision making – Basic Tactical understanding – Understanding basic positional responsibilities and relationships – understanding various “faces of the foot” – 1v1 attack, 1v1 defense st nd – 1 touch, 2 touch – use of all body parts to control ball – understanding movement off the ball – Understanding proper body preparation – Understanding timing of movement and the use of visual cues – Separation of linear and dynamic technical development Psychological – Develop the ability to withstand criticism – Develop the ability to deal with success – Recover from mistakes – Learn to recover from injury – Learn the mindset of a substitute and how to deal with being substituted – How to deal with opponent intimidation – Self-belief and confidence – Learn to nullify negative self-talk – Learn to set achievable goals – Learn to have patience and focus on long-term goals – Learn to develop a performance routine Fitness/Physical Aerobic development is emphasized at onset of growth spurt – Determine window of trainability – Introduce resistance training – Focus on functional strength – structured flexibility and mobility exercises integrated into training – Monitor diet – Monitor hydration – Maintain quality sleep habits – Monitor growth every three months – encourage involvement in complimentary sports Training to Compete Three Key Program Guidelines Technical/Tactical – Technique refinement and broadening of skill range – Integration of opposition training – Understanding of group combinations and linking lines together – Introduction of functional and position specific training – Understanding tempo play – Understanding of the philosophy behind the methodical attack – Understanding of various systems of play – Advanced understanding of the use of visual cues, dictation of play, and the manipulation of opposition players Psychological Commitment to keep learning – Ability to overcome injury – Ability to concentrate for 90+ minutes – Maintain composure during battle – How to deal with a drop in performance – Mental toughness – Enjoying the daily challenge – Maintaining a calm demeanor when in pressurized situations – Learn to compete every session – Learn to rehearse a performance routine. Fitness/Physical – Fitness and recovery is tailored to the individual – Periodized strength program – Individualized strength training program – Focus on functional strength – Flexibility training becomes individualized – Monitor sleep habits – Encourage naps – Monitor dietary intake – Monitor hydration levels 11 7. – RTC-SK Sports Sport Science Integration Within the past few decades our world has changed and as a result today? s athlete is brought up in a culture where there is a substantial lack of free play. Reasons for this are numerous and vary widely but the result is an athlete who suffers from substandard proprioceptive development, impaired skills when competing under pressure or when required to solve game-related problems and a need for improved cardiovascular function, strength, and flexibility. Through partnerships with members of the Saskatchewan Soccer Association Sports Science Team sports science education and implementation is an integral component of the RTC-SK curriculum.

Training sessions are designed to not only improve techical ability and tactical understanding of the individual but also: Include whole-body movements which develop the neuro-motor system and produce movement „on-demand? in a variety of situations Economize metabolic pathways to produce energy efficiently and drive athlete performance requirements Educate on energy needs and how to best „fuel? the body pre and post training/competition Develop mental strength, anticipatory and attentional mechanisms Utilize guided-discovery to build confidence and increase problem solving skills. Monitoring the progress of each athlete will be conducted using personal training logs.

An electronic daily log document will be provided to each athlete and is to be completed on training days; optimally at the conclusion of each RTC training session. It is recommended that RTC athletes complete their training log on additional days however it is not mandatory. Physical testing of select RTC-SK/NTC-P athletes will be conducted regularly throughout the indoor training season. This is to record objective performance values and adjust the on-field training regimen as required. A sports science team has been recruited and will conduct and maintain a set testing regimen with the athletes. Focused areas of Sport Science integration: Strength & Conditioning RTC-SK apprentices will conduct weekly SAQ/physical training sessions.

These sessions will occur on-field during regular scheduled training times with members of the sports science team. Athletes will be provided increasingly complex exercises relating to their measured movement inefficiencies. The trainers listed below have been recruited to provide physical training to the RTC players. We thank them for their support in the development of soccer players in Saskatchewan. Craven Sports Services in Saskatoon (Bruce Craven) Physiology In soccer both short-term and long-term energy production is required. As a result training sessions are designed to develop the body? s ability to produce muscular contraction via a combination of anaerobic (without oxygen) and aerobic (with oxygen) pathways.

Mental Training Mental training programs will be developed for both coaches and players and will maintain a separate and distinct focus. For the players the mental training techniques that will be instituted will be goal setting, imagery, arousal control and self talk. These components will be developed over the entirety of the program and will become an important focus for any athlete competing in high-performance programs. Coach? s goals will be to help the players develop their own ability to self-judge their own performance and eliminate self-doubt. 12 Nutrition (Preparation & Recovery) Pre-training/competition fueling and post-training/competition recovery is integral for athletes to understand and practice daily.

Like an automobile our athletes burn fuel to produce work; the more octane the fuel has the less chance of our athletes experiencing “knock” and the better their resulting performance output. Each athlete will be presented with information on proper pre and post game nutritional intake. Athletes will learn how to monitor their hydration levels in both training sessions and competitions. Neurophysiological Development (Information Processing, Agility, Balance and Coordination) Throughout the training and match environment athletes are continuously presented with stimuli. To produce a motor response said stimuli must first be identified and the correct response selected and programmed.

Within the RTC-SK our goal is to enhance motor performance by training athletes to decrease the time it takes for stimulus identification and response selection. Additionally it is important to ensure an effective motor response is produced. Specific sensors within the body detect body position, muscular tension, and balance/coordination. By training the neural communication system apprentices are better equipped to read, adapt and respond to environmental circumstance. Trigger Point Stretching and Recovery Regimen Traditionally static stretching has been utilized a part of a pre-training/competition warm-up routine in the attempt to improve performance and decrease injuries.

Evidence shows this is not necessarily the case however and studies have shown that traditional static stretching methodologies may be responsible for performance deficits in activities requiring speed, strength and power. To ensure our high-performance athletes are provided the best opportunity to perform at their peak, the RTC-SK athletes will follow a purposely designed trigger point therapy program and dynamic stretching program. Trigger point therapy targets tight bundles of muscle and releases these to improve total muscle belly length. This lengthening of the muscle belly increases the length of the muscle and thus the flexibility in the targeted area. The dynamic stretching routine utilizes game related movements to prepare the body for training or competition.

Short duration dynamic movements activate neurophysiological mechanisms that enhance performance. Each routine is based on scientific principles and has been developed through preliminary application within the Saskatchewan Provincial Teams program. With the use of these performance tools we hope to enhance performance by creating strong, elastic muscles that can produce, reduce, and stabilize force in multiple planes of motion. 13 8. 0 – RTC-SK Medical Protocol All RTC players are expected to follow the following procedure with any type or form of injury they sustain while training at the RTC-SK: Contact Terrol Russell immediately at 306-975-0860 or t. [email protected] om Contact designated RTC-SK and approved Saskatchewan Sports Medicine and Science Council Sport Therapist to arrange and assessment (please see below) After treatment, inform Terrol Russell by e-mail with details of your medical status. It is recommended for injured RTC-SK/NTC-P player(s) to resume play with NTC/RTC, Club, or Provincial Program only after having been cleared by a physiotherapist/physician. RTC-SK designated therapists 1. Craven Sports Services, 3-630 2 nd ave. north. Phone: 306-934-2011 2. Zone Sports Therapy, suite 102-311 Ludlow st. phone: 306-477-9663 Saskatchewan Sports Medicine and Science Council – Sports Therapists NOTE: Therapists can be any of the following practicing professionals.

Athletic Therapist – A Certified Athletic Therapist with a Scope of Practice including the assessment, prevention, immediate care, and reconditioning of musculoskeletal injuries. Diploma Sport Physio – A licensed Physical Therapist that can assist in the development of conditioning and flexibility programs, acute injury care, and complete rehabilitation of the athlete back to competitive level. Expert at taping and strong manual therapy skills. Certificate Sport Physio – A licensed Physical Therapist trained in care of critically injured athlete, taping skills, knowledge of equipment, field care and sideline care of athletes, massage and some manual therapy skills. Level 1 Sport Physio – A licensed Physical Therapist who has been trained as an athletic first aider.

POLICY REGARDING – INITIAL INJURY ASSESSMENTS Note #1 – The prior listed therapists are all members of their respective sport therapy associations and can provide initial injury assessments. However, some may choose not to be involved with this service. Note # 2 – The SMSCS may cover the cost of an initial injury assessment for Saskatchewan High Performance Athletes with any of the certified athletic therapists, diploma sport physio’s, and certificate sport physio’s. Contact the SMSCS at (s. [email protected] net) or (306-780-9446) prior to the appointment to discuss payment/coverage options. Any additional treatments will be at the cost of the athlete paid directly to the clinic/therapist. Note #3 – The SMSCS will not cover the cost of initial assessments with therapists with only a level 1 sport physio designation.

IMPORTANT: When contacting any of the following Therapists for an appointment, indicate the Sport Medicine & Science Council assisted you with the Therapist’s name for booking an appointment. 14 8. 0 – RTC-SK Physical Testing Dates and Protocol To achieve performance excellence in the current-day game of soccer, athletes are required to transition faster, cover more distance, develop polished anticipatory mechanisms, and continually refine technical ability and tactical understanding. Due to this subjective accounts of performance are no longer acceptable as the single measurement of an athlete? s physical output. Instead subjective views will be accompanied by objective performance standards through the capture and analysis of athlete physical, mental, technical, and tactical capacities.

Including objective measurements in the training environment benefits the coach through greater control over training plan design and execution. Athlete benefits result from a renewed level of accountability and tools to regularly measure progress. Athletes will be recorded (video, questionnaires, game notation and physical tests) at various times during the training season for the purpose of creating a player development database. This database will allow the practitioners the opportunity to provide the athlete quality feedback and adjust training schemas. Assessing how well apprentices execute specific skills and perform on measured performance criteria, allows the staff to verify training curriculum effectiveness and evaluate the learning and performance of motor skills.

All fitness testing will be done in accordance with the protocol established by the RTC-SK Sports Science Team and although the exact testing regimen is yet to be confirmed, tests in the following areas may be included: Soccer Specific Field Tests Perceptual-Cognitive Tests Tests of Aerobic Performance Tests of Anaerobic Performance Speed-Endurance Tests Flexibility Tests Agility Tests Speed Tests Strength Tests 15 9. 0 – RTC-SK Training Schedule RTC-SK Training to Train schedule (U13/U14/U15) Session # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Date Oct. 31/11 Nov. 02/11 Nov. 07/11 Nov. 09/11 Nov. 14/11 Nov 16/11 Nov. 8/11 Nov 21/11 Nov 23/11 Nov 28/11 Nov 30/11 Dec 02/11 Dec 05/11 Dec 07/11 Dec 12/11 Dec 14/11 Jan 04/12 Jan 09/12 Jan 11/12 Jan 13/12 Jan 16/12 Jan 18/12 Jan 23/12 Jan 25/12 Jan 27/12 Jan 30/12 Feb 01/12 Feb 06/12 Day Mon Wed Mon Wed Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Mon Wed Wed Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Mon Start 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. End 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m.

Location S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre 16 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

Feb 08/12 Feb 10/12 Feb 13/12 Feb 15/12 Feb 27/12 Feb 29/12 Mar 02/12 Mar 05/12 Mar 07/12 Mar 09/12 Mar 12/12 Mar 14/12 Mar 16/12 Mar 19/12 Mar 21/12 Mar 23/12 Mar 26/12 Mar 28/12 Mar 30/12 Apr 02/12 Apr 04/12 Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) Mon Wed Fri (SAQ) 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. :30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre Mon Wed 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 17 RTC-SK Training to Compete schedule (U15/U16/U17)

Session # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Date Oct. 31/11 Nov. 01/11 Nov. 02/11 Nov. 07/11 Nov 08/11 Nov. 09/11 Nov 10/11 Nov 14/11 Nov 15/11 Nov. 16/11 Nov. 17/11 Nov. 18/11 Nov. 21/11 Nov. 22/11 Nov. 23/11 Nov. 24/11 Nov. 28/11 Nov 29/11 Nov. 30/11 Dec 01/11 Dec 02/11 Dec 05/11 Dec 06/11 Dec 07/11 Dec 08/11 Dec 12/11 Dec 13/11 Dec 14/11 Dec 15/11 Dec 16/11 Jan 03/12 Day Mon Tues Wed (SAQ) Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Tues Start 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. :00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. End 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m.

Location S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre 18 2 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 Jan 04/12 Jan 05/12 Jan 09/12 Jan 10/12 Jan 11/12 Jan 12/12 Jan 13/12 Jan 16/12 Jan 17/12 Jan 18/12 Jan 19/12 Jan 23/12 Jan 24/12 Jan 25/12 Jan 26/12 Jan 27/12 Jan 30/12 Jan 31/12 Feb 01/12 Feb 02/12 Feb 06/12 Feb 07/12 Feb 08/12 Feb 09/12 Feb 10/12 Feb 13/12 Feb 14/12 Feb 15/12 Feb 16/12 Feb 27/12 Feb 28/12 Feb 29/12 Mar 01/12 Wed (SAQ) Thur Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. . 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m.

S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre 19 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89

Mar 02/12 Mar 05/12 Mar 06/12 Mar 07/12 Mar 08/12 Mar 09/12 Mar 12/12 Mar 13/12 Mar 14/12 Mar 15/12 Mar 16/12 Mar 19/12 Mar 20/12 Mar 21/12 Mar 22/12 Mar 23/12 Mar 26/12 Mar 27/12 Mar 28/12 Mar 29/12 Mar 30/12 Apr 02/12 Apr 03/12 Apr 04/12 Apr 05/12 Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m. 5:00 p. m. 5:30 p. m.

S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre S’tel Soccer Centre East Kavia S’tel Soccer Centre Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur Fri Mon (SAQ) Tues Wed (SAQ) Thur 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 4:00 p. m. 20 10. 0 – NTC-P Scouting Dates In addition to RTC–SK training, select apprentices will also have the opportunity to participate in NTC-P Scouting Weekends. NTC Scouting Weekends provided identified RTC-SK apprentices with the opportunity to compete with their peers from Manitoba and Alberta in front of National Team scouts.

For more information on the National Training Centre – Prairies, please visit www. ntcprairies. ca. Apprentices will be selected for NTC based on their ability and performance at RTC-SK training sessions alongside their level of maturational development and mental strength. Selected apprentices will be notified two weeks in advance of the scouting weekend, however, all RTC-SK athletes are asked to ensure they are available for these weekends. Date of NTC Evaluation Weekend October 14-16, 2011 March 9-11, 2012 (NTC Prairies Select Team Travel date) April 20-22, 2012 Location Edmonton – Clarke Stadium TBA Edmonton – Clarke Stadium 11. 0 – Appreciation

Without the support of the soccer community, SaskSport and the Canadian Soccer Association programs like the Regional Training Centre Saskatchewan would not be possible. Special thanks are given to Jodi Blackwell and Grace Kachur of the SSCI as their support is integral to development of a full-time indoor high performance program. Also thanks to the Districts, Clubs, Associations, Technical Directors, Coaches, and Parents for their dedication to the game in helping the Apprentices reach their dreams and goals. For all questions and clarifications please contact: Terrol Russell (306) 975-0860 or t. [email protected] com Coordinator of High Performance Programs Saskatchewan Soccer Association 21