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Five Factor Model

Five Factor Model

Five Factor Model Dexter Johnson Abstract Most human personality traits can be boiled down to five broad dimensions of personality, regardless of language or culture. It is done by something called factor analysis (“The OCEAN Has Five Dimensions ,” 2011). The five dimensions that have emerged from statistical data analyses, are at times compared with five “big buckets” (groups). They are the Big Five, that make up the OCEAN (an acronym). This Five Factor Model is FFM, in short. Since the 1990s the consensus of psychologists have gradually came to support the Big Five (“The OCEAN Has Five Dimensions ,” 2011).

It allows for renaming the factors, as wll be shown below. The first letters of the five factors – Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism – give the acronyms of OCEAN (and CANOE if rearranged). Neuroticism is sometimes called Emotional Stability, and also “Need for Stability”. There is some disagreement about how to interpret the Openness factor – called “Originality” below, and “Intellect” by others (“The OCEAN Has Five Dimensions ,” 2011) Five Factor Model

Most human personality traits can be boiled down to five broad dimensions of personality, regardless of language or culture. It is done by something called factor analysis (“The OCEAN Has Five Dimensions ,” 2011).. The five dimensions that have emerged from statistical data analyses, are at times compared with five “big buckets” (groups). They are the Big Five, that make up the OCEAN (an acronym). This Five Factor Model is FFM, in short. Since the 1990s the consensus of psychologists have gradually came to support the Big Five (“The OCEAN Has Five Dimensions ,” 2011)..

It allows for renaming the factors, as wll be shown below. The first letters of the five factors – Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism – give the acronyms of OCEAN (and CANOE if rearranged). Neuroticism is sometimes called Emotional Stability, and also “Need for Stability”. There is some disagreement about how to interpret the Openness factor – called “Originality” below, and “Intellect” by others (“The OCEAN Has Five Dimensions ,” 2011).. Each of the five factors consists of a cluster of more specific traits that correlate together.

The Big Five is currently the most reliable and well-validated system of trait description. Feel free to think, “The Big 5 – fit for times of peace, more unfit for war, perhaps”, because openness and agreeableness may hinder combatting, and extroversion too may not fit secrecy making and desorientation (lying) that often goes along with outwardly successful warfare. The “Big Five” (each trait exists on a high/low scale) is the most used current psychometric measurement perspective in personality psychology.

The five dimensions, with alternate terms put in brackets – are: Openness An open team member can be someone that is curious, original, intellectual, creative and open to new ideas. They tend to be more aware of their feelings and are more likely to hold unconventional beliefs (“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Others with lower scores prefer the straightforward over the complex or ambiguous. This is because they may have more conventional and traditional interests(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011).

It is also found that people who are more open are more appreciative of the arts, and may approach the sciences with more apprehension while it is the reverse for people who are more closed(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Some behavorial examples of those who are highly open include taking the initiative to learn something new simply for the joy of learning, watching documentaries or educational television, looking for stimulating activities that break up one’s routine(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Conscientiousness

A conscientious team member can be someone who is organized, systematic, punctual, achievement oriented and dependable. These people show a distinct preference for planning their schedule ahead(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). They also have act dutifully according to jobs tasked to them, and aim for achievement against measures or outside expectations(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). The trait generally describes someone who brainstorms ideas before acting, delaying gratification, following norms and rules, and planning, organizing and prioritizing tasks. (“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011).

Some behavourial examples of those who are highly conscientious include arriving early or on time for meeting, double-checking work before submission(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Extraversion A team member who is extraverted can be outgoing, talkative, sociable, and enjoys social situations. It is characterized by positive emotions, and the tendency to seek out stimulation and the company of other colleagues(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Extraverts enjoy being around their colleagues, and are often perceived as full of energy because of their enthusiasm and quest for excitement.

In groups, they like to talk, assert themselves, and draw attention to themselves(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). The opposite of these extroverts seem quiet, low-key, deliberate, and less involved in the social world. However, their lack of social involvement should not be interpreted as shyness or depression(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Introverts simply need less stimulation than extraverts and more time alone. They may be very active and energetic, simply not socially(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). The trait generally implies an energetic approach toward the social and material world.

Some behavioral examples of high openness include approaching new colleagues and introducing themselves; taking the lead in organizing a project. The reverse includes keeping quiet when one disagrees with others (“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Agreeableness A team member who has high levels of agreeableness can be affable, tolerant, sensitive, trusting, kind and warm(“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Agreeable individuals value getting along with other colleagues and are generally considerate, friendly, generous, helpful, and willing to compromise their interests with others (“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011).

Disagreeable individuals on the other hand are less concerned with others’ well being, and are less likely to extend themselves for other people. They have more skepticism about others’ motives, which causes them to be suspicious, unfriendly, and uncooperative (“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Some behavioral examples of highly agreeable individuals include emphasizing the good qualities of other people during peer evaluation (“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). Neuroticism A team member who is neurotic can be anxious, irritable, temperamental, and moody.

People who are more neurotic have a higher tendency to experience negative emotions, such as anger, anxiety, or depression during stress at work (“Big Five Personality Test,” 2011). References Big Five Personality Test. (2011). Leadership With You, Retrieved from http://www. leadership-with-you. com/big-five-personality-test. html Big Five. (2011). Out Of Service, Retrieved from http://www. outofservice. com/bigfive/results/? oR=0. 625&cR=0. 694&eR=0. 656&aR=0. 667&nR=0. 219&y=1960&g=m The OCEAN Has Five Dimensions. (2011). OCEAN Considerations and Narcissism, (). Retrieved from http://oaks. nvg. org/eg6ra15. html