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MMI Product Placement: Communication and Personal Selling

MMI Product Placement: Communication and Personal Selling

MMI Product Placement Communication and Personal Selling Marketing Plan Executive Summary Brand awareness and recognition are very important factors for businesses. One of the key strategies is product placement. Business are increasingly using product placement in the overall marketing strategy. Many talent agencies and advertising agencies offer product placement services as this market is increasing. MMI Product Placement is a pioneer in the business. They have been credited in many feature films and TV episodes. MMI increases brand awareness and positive brand association.

MMI strives to select the best placement, negotiate the right contracts and provide exposure at an attractive price. Greyhound has enlisted MMI services for positive product awareness. MMI must resolve issues before presenting Greyhound with an informative and productive presentation. MMI must reassure the apprehensive Greyhound that product placement would be an effective method for consumer awareness. MMI must decide which placement would be the best suited for the large intercity bus transportation company. One script has been received, which would meet the requirements and marketing objectives.

TV Serial “Making the Cut” would be an ideal placement; However, Phil Hart cannot provide a guaranteed viewership or detail of the demographics. MMI has 4 alternatives to consider in deciding the best product placement strategy. 1. Product Placement on TV Serial “Making the Cut” 2. Product Placement on TV Serial “Corner Gas” 3. Product Placement on TV Serial “Canadian Idol” 4. Status Quo Do not pursue Greyhound The recommendation is that MMI present Greyhound alternative #3, Product Placement in TV Serial in “Canadian Idol. Canadian Idol has the target audience and the viewership that is required for Greyhound to meet their objectives. The contingency plan would be MMI use alternative #1, Product Placement in TV Serial in “Making the Cut. ” The viewership and demographic would be close to the target audience. MMI must convince Greyhound that product placement is the key to consumer and awareness. MMI must preserve the good relationship and effectively produce a product placement strategy to meet Greyhounds business objectives. Problem Statements MMI is presenting a marketing strategy to Greyhound.

Greyhound is a large intercity bus transportation company who searching for a cost-effective method to communicate with its consumers. MMI Product Placement Inc feels that with proper product placement Greyhound will meet their objective. Greyhound has doubts about this marketing strategy and feels that more traditional advertising are more effective. Greyhound is apprehension about the message being seen by the right viewers and be shown in an unfavourable light. It is difficult to see the benefits of product placement and is hard to measure.

Since there are no performance metrics Greyhound is unsure that product placement will increase their business. MMI must decide weather product placement of Greyhound in Making the Cut TV Serial would meet the promotional needs of Greyhound. MMI is unable to provide guarantee viewership or audience demographics on the TV serial. Therefore, MMI must convince Greyhound that product placement is worthwhile. Company Objectives MMI provides the best product placement services. They work as a talent agency to influence strong relationships with Canadian film industry executives.

Their placement contracts are negotiated with the clients marketing strategy in mind. They provide value opportunities, which provide exposure at an extremely attractive cost. MMI chooses scripts that would best represent the brand of the client. Product placement allows heighted brand recognition. Company Background Pioneers in product placement MMI was established in 1985. MMI placed products over 2000 in feature films and TV episodes. MMI mandates that they will select the best placement opportunities, negotiate placement contracts and offer value by exposure. MMI has built relationships with Canadian entertainment industry.

MMI receives many scripts from TV companies, which are analyzed for potential placement opportunities. MMI informs the client about the opportunity, they negotiate for placement and exceptional support. Once complete MMI would inform the client of the films or TV episodes release date. MMI also monitored and tracked product placement which are shared at marketing seminars. MMI feels that product placement can increase consumer awareness. MMI only has a handful of competitors in industry. Their growing competition is from full service advertising agencies. MMI advantage is doing business based on relationships.

MMI read many scripts and present the best marketing opportunities to the clients for strong consumer awareness and brand recognition. Situation Analysis Strengths • MM1 was established in 1985 and has over 2,000product placements to its credit • Strong relationships with the entertainment industry built over many years • MM1 regularly receives scripts from established film and TV companies to analyze for product placement opportunities • MM1 uses editing software to distribute relevant scenes via e-mail, CD-ROM, DVD or VHS and owns proprietary software to assess the impact of its placements for each client. Potential customer Greyhound has one of the most recognized brands in the world. MM1’s reputation will improve by having this well known customer. • Additional income could be made from the leveraged licensing fee, whereby the placement agency received payment if a relevant character was later hired to serve as product spokesperson in other media Weaknesses • Potential customer Greyhound is unsure of the effect of product placement since there are no generally accepted performance metrics in the product placement industry. Labour cost is significant since the business thrives on personal relationships, hard work and referrals • MM1 can not afford to gauge the increase in consumer awareness that product placement causes themselves. They must rely on two other firms to provide this data. • Data from AC Nielsen and BBM that MM1 relies on provides no definitive answers. Bothe companies extrapolate findings from a small pool to an infinitely larger TV audience and can lead to incorrect conclusions. MM1’s Placement Quantifying Scale is subjective and only as accurate as the inputs it is given. Opportunities • Product placement is generally cheaper then TV commercials • Product placement is less ‘in your face’ than traditional advertising – more unobtrusive to consumers • After a production is released, it appears before millions of additional viewers via pay TV, cable TV, network TV, and DVD. Product placement can trigger coverage in other outlets such as company newsletters, newspaper articles or websites. • A product’s appearance, verbal reference, or use by a star raises consumer awareness of the brand to an extent that can not be compared with any other media vehicle • Currently there are only a handful of direct rivals • This is a growing market and paid placement is on the rise • Companies are willing to pay a premium for a brand to be used in the right context in the visual medium. Blend of in-show placement and 30-second TV advertising spots in the same TV series is becoming popular • Automation and standardization coming – central website systems to evaluate and bid on potential placement opportunities are being developed • Digital brand integration will allow different products placed in the TV episode or movie based on geographical location, or time period, and existing media could be altered as well • As more and more Canadian families watch TV using digital video recorders (DVR) system, which enable viewers to skip advertisement, product placement becomes more attractive comparing with traditional advertising • The popularity and impact of traditional television advertising have been in decline in recent years as a result of increased costs and competition from cable and independent networks since the late 1980s.

This trend has forced the big television networks and their sponsors–the advertisers-to become more aggressive in utilizing alternative avenues of persuasion • There is growing concern that viewers are tuning out formal advertisements or switching channels during commercial breaks, behaviour called zapping. An increasingly popular strategy used by marketers to combat zapping is product placement. Threats • There is a threat with product placement that products could be shown in an unfavourable light, hurting the placement company’s brand instead of improving it. • The TV show or movie that the product is placed in may not be watched by the right viewers or the company’s target market. • There is growing competition from full service ad companies who set up product placement arms as a way of providing a “one stop shop” • Unpredictable nature of business Greyhound had a long-standing relationship with its advertising agency, who would almost certainly encourage the company to stick with traditional advertising and its tangible metrics • Canada produces a modest amount of TV/Films – limiting product placement opportunities & increasing competition Market Analysis Product placement, also called embedded marketing, is a form of advertisement, in which trademarked goods are embedded into popular entertainment products in order to encourage their consumption. Product Placement is set to be on the agenda of many advertising and marketing discussions in near future due to the extraordinary growth over recent times.

The value of all product placements in media climbed at a compound annual rate of 10. 5% since 1974. Product placement experienced a surge in the mid-1980s and strong growth afterwards. Product placement’s growth is coming at the advertising market’s expense, according to PQ Media, as marketers more aggressively migrate dollars away from advertising to alternative media, especially product placement. While product placement spending surged 30. 5% in 2004, advertising and marketing expenditures rose just 7% for the year. To compensate for this perception of diminished advertising returns, marketers have substantially ratcheted up the role of product placement in their buying strategies.

In short, product placement – the seamless integration of products into media – is becoming an integral part of a larger marketing package for many advertisers that include traditional advertising and alternative marketing such as product placement. It is predicted that the product placement market is projected to reach 6. 1 billion by 2014. The product placement market is growing in television. By 2010, product placements will be present in 75 percent of all prime time scripted shows because of its cost advantage compared with television commercials. It is also due to increasing use of digital video recorders (DVR), which enable viewers to skip advertisements. Research says that 42% of Canadian will have a PVR in their home by 2011. The value of television product placements soared 46. 4% to US$1. 87 billion in 2004, and grew at a compound annual rate of 21. % from 1999 to 2004, as reality television became a haven for numerous product placement deals. Meanwhile, the value of product placements in films rose 14. 6% to US$1. 25 billion in 2004, and grew 11. 4% on a compound annual basis in the 1999-2004 periods, according to Product Placement Spending in Media 2005. Spending in the other media segments, including magazines, newspapers, video games, the Internet, music, books and radio, increased 19. 9% in 2004 to US$325. 8 million, and rose at a compound annual rate of 11. 7% from 1999 to 2004. Product placement shifts from a barter and gratis model to a payment model. In Canada, paid placement was on the order of $19. million out of a total market of $57. 2 million in 2005. The estimated total global spending on paid product placements is about US$2. 21 billion, with an additional US$3. 78 billion of cash-equivalent on in-kind deals in the same year. Segmentation |Segment # |1 |2 |3 | |Name |Big shark |Medium fish |Small shrimp | |Qualifying dimensions | | | | |Who? Big companies, large corporation |Medium size companies |Small size companies, sole proprietors & | | | | |LLPs | |What? |Famous, well-known brand name |Products that commonly use in daily |New idea, new product or concept | | |product/service |life focus on value | | |When |often |Somewhat often |Seldom, normally before or right after | | | | |available on market | |Where? Movie, TV, commercial, game show, |Movie, TV, reality show, etc. |Movie, TV, reality show, etc | | |music video, etc | | | |Why? |Remind buyer for the promoted |Expose products to potential buyers,|Promote new products; introduce new | | |brands, maintain or expand market |Expand market share |ideas/products | | |share | | | |How? Direct payment/cheque/cash |Direct payment/cheque/cash/product |Direct payment/cheque/cash/product | |Segment size |65% |30% |5% | |Trends |Steady, growing |Steady, growing |growing | |Determining dimensions | | | | |Benefits sought |Convenience |Convenience |Convenience | | |Time and effort |Time and effort |Time and effort | | |relationship |relationship |relationship | |Usage rate |Often |Somewhat often |seldom | Current and Targeted Market: The current and targeted market is large corporation (big shark) and medium sized company (medium fish). Potential Market: The potential market is small size companies. Competitive Analysis MM1 was a pioneer of product placement. Since Canada produced a relatively modest number of home-grown feature films and television shows, MM1 faced only a handful of direct rivals. However, the company was seeing growing competition from full-service ad agencies, many of which had set up product placement arms as a means of providing clients with a one-stop shop.

Direct competitors include other placement agencies, brand managers, and conventional full-service ad agencies. Production companies are also a direct competitor as clients can choose to approach the production company themselves and avoid the middle-man. Indirect competitors include traditional advertising, web-based advertising, and personal selling. |Direct Competitors |Small Placement Agencies |Independent product placement |Placement Divisions in Large |Brand Managers |Production Companies | | | |agencies |Advertising Agencies | | | |Who are they? Small “mom and pop” |Specialized independent |Large advertising agencies who |Brand managers can facilitate |Clients can go straight to | | |placement agencies owned |agencies similar to MM1 |try to provide a one-stop shop |product placements directly with |production companies and | | |and operated by their | |and have a product placement |production companies |avoid the middleman | | |founders | |division | | | |Key Advantages |Because they are small, |Provide the best service, many |The client can deal with one |Cheaper for the client because the|Cheaper for the client | | |labour costs are low, |scripts read, and much thought |company for all of their |brand manager can facilitate all |because they don’t have to | | |charges to client will |given to placements, proven |advertising needs – more |brand advertising decisions, not |pay a middleman whose fees | | |generally be less |relationships with production |convenient |just product placement and |range from $15,000 to50,000 | | | |companies, many years of | |approach roduction companies |annually | | | |experience | |directly | | |Key Disadvantages |Hard to provide the same |The client will need a |Less experience with product |Less experience with product |The production companies give| | |level of service as some |different company to provide |placements, not enough time to |placements, not enough time to |little thought to what | | |of the larger competitors |other advertising services |read dozens of scripts and |read dozens of scripts and provide|opportunities actually help a| | | | |provide the same level of |the same level of service as |client’s brand. | | | |service as independent |independent placement agencies | | | | | |placement agencies | | | Positioning Table [pic] Key Factors Key Opportunities • Normal advertising agencies lack the experience and knowledge base possessed by MMI when it comes to delivering services in the capacity of a product placement agency. • The usage of new technology that offers owners the ease to modify content and customize existing product appearances is a great opportunity for MMI to add value to the current services being provided to their clients. This will ensure the payoff from product placement can be extended for the clients’ products.

Key Success Factors • MMI services it clients using the network it has built with the Canadian entertainment industry and by tapping into the strong relationships with the producers and directors of the film and television industry. • MMI ensures that the products are placed using a proper sequential process which includes analyzing scripts, informing the client of the opportunity and following up the placement by monitoring the scenes and keeping the client apprised of the episodes. Key Uncertainties • Consumer Acceptance: Despite of the reputable service synonymous with Greyhounds name, the customer usage of it as a primary mode of travel is not favourable.

There is no way to predict if this way of advertising will bring about any changes in the consumer preference and increase the market share of Greyhound. • Competitive Reaction: At the present time, Greyhound has had a long relationship with its traditional advertising agency. Once the advertising agency gains knowledge that they may loose a large client like Greyhound they will definitely pitch traditional advertising back to Greyhound in an effort to hold on to the account Alternatives Phil Hart, President of MM1 Product Placement Inc should follow the AIDA model – Attention, Interest, Desire, and Action; to sell product placement as a promotional vehicle for Greyhound’s branding. Attention: Make Greyhound aware of what MMI Product Placement has to offer • Interest: Get Greyhound interested in product placement as a promotional vehicle for branding • Desire: Make Greyhound evaluate their options surrounding product placement • Action: Encourage action to try product placement as a promotional vehicle to revamp Greyhounds brand. Phil Hart has to address the concerns raised by Greyhound and assure them that product placement will reach their target market, allow them to reposition their brand and result in increased revenue. He has to decide on the right promotional vehicle for Greyhound’s needs. He has to ensure that their concerns regarding difficulty in measuring the effectiveness of product placement are addressed. Product Placement is a highly effective promotional tool that can reach a vast number of consumers, however Phil Hart has to addresses Greyhounds concerns in order to close the sale. The options Phil can select from are: Alternative 1

Make a presentation to convince Greyhound that product placement on the TV serial “Making the Cut” was the right promotional vehicle for their needs Phil Hart should get an in-depth understanding of Greyhound’s needs. He should identify Greyhound’s concerns with product placement, and their desire to measure the effectiveness of product placement. The presentation should highlight the benefits of going with product placement, how it will reach their target market by being featured on 21 episodes on national television. In addition to this, making the Cut has website and newspaper advertising material currently for the program which would increase potential awareness for the program. The presentation can also highlight the effects of new technology on the business of product placement. Making the Cut’ is a new program. There is no historical viewer ship data that can be used to measure the potential viewer ship for this program. The pros and cons for this alternative are: Pros • Greyhound will receive good exposure during prime time programming. It will be featured on 21 episodes, three times per episode for 45 second at a time. About 1/3 of this time the Greyhound logo would be clearly visible while the bus is being driven, loaded, unloaded etc. • Greyhound buses will be portrayed transporting players to and from venues – creating effective branding • Reality show will be telecast nationally which aligns with Greyhounds market across the country. As it is a new show with uncertain viewer ship, cost can be negotiated at a lower side in comparison to other established shows as Canadian idol and Corner Gas Cons • Viewer ship of the show will not be available until after the show is telecast, making it difficult to measure the effectiveness of product placement prior to the telecast. • Very difficult to prove that the audience would match Greyhounds target market. • Male viewers are more likely to watch a reality program on hockey; female target market may not be reached. • No track record for the show so cannot guarantee viewer ship or provide detailed demographics until after the show airs • “Making the Cut” is a new show. Its popularity and success can not be guaranteed. Alternative 2

Make a presentation to convince Greyhound that product placement on the TV serial “Corner Gas” was the right promotional vehicle for their needs Phil needs to communicate the benefits of product placement and what it can do for Greyhounds products. He can address their concerns of tangible metrics. Phil can show Greyhound that by selecting a promotional tool such as Corner Gas for product placement that they would be better aligned with Greyhounds target audience. He would discuss strengths such as – how the show has a large audience and viewer ship is among the top three at 1,150,000. The cost of the 30 second spot at $14,000 is less than the actual placement value of $21,000.

It is an established show with measurable viewer ship. Viewers of this show cross all age groups and would fall within the target segment of 18-44 both male and female. The pros and cons for this alternative are: Pros • Long running popular successful show with viewer ship of 1,150,000 across Canada • Large variety of viewers both male and female will be within Greyhounds target market of 18-44 yrs • Low cost for 30 second spot of $14,000 – while placement value is $21,000 • Reality show will be telecast nationally which aligns with Greyhounds market across the country. Cons • Very difficult to prove that the audience would match Greyhounds target market. It has the highest cost for a 30-second spot among the other programs • It is unlikely that Greyhound would be featured as prominently on Corner Gas as it would be on Making the Cut • It is difficult to make a bus fit into Corner’s Gas’s storyline seamlessly whereas with Making the Cut, a bus is needed to transport the players often. Alternative 3 Make a presentation to convince Greyhound that product placement on the TV serial “Canadian Idol” was the right promotional vehicle for their needs Phil needs to communicate the benefits of product placement and what it can do for Greyhounds products. He can address their concerns of tangible metrics. Phil can show Greyhound that by selecting a promotional tool such as Canadian Idol for product placement that they would be better aligned with Greyhounds target audience. He would discuss strengths such as – how the show has the largest English speaking audience and viewer ship is at 1,425,000.

The cost of the 30-second spot at $10,000 is less than the actual placement value of $15,000. It is an established show with measurable viewer ship. Viewers of this show cross all age groups and would fall within the target segment of 18-44 both male and female. The pros and cons for this alternative are: Pros • Long running popular successful show with viewer ship of 1,425,000 across Canada • Large variety of viewers both male and female will be within Greyhounds target market of 18-44 yrs • Low cost for 30 second spot of $10,000 – while placement value is $15,000 • Reality show will be telecast nationally which aligns with Greyhounds market across the country. A Greyhound bus would fit in with Canadian Idol’s storyline as musicians are often arriving and leaving at the audition studios Cons • Very difficult to prove that the audience would match Greyhounds target market. • It is unlikely that Greyhound would be featured as prominently on Canadian Idol as it would be on Making the Cut. Alternative 4 Status Quo – Don’t pursue Greyhound Phil Hart can choose not to pursue Greyhound and continuing to focus his energies on other clients that they have strong relationships with. Greyhound has a long-standing relationship with a very traditional advertising agency that has met their advertising needs so far.

Phil Hart is not able to produce performance metrics that will reassure Greyhound that product placement is good value for their advertising dollars, whereas Greyhound’s current advertising agency can produce tangible metrics to show promotional effectiveness. Lack of ability to measure the effectiveness of product placement will make it difficult to convince Greyhound if they are looking for concrete metrics to base their decision on. The pros and cons for this alternative are: Pros • Phil Hart can focus efforts on pursuing other clients to build their business • No additional cost on selling product placement idea to Greyhound Cons • Loss of potential revenues from loosing Greyhound’s business • Reputation may be hampered on loosing a major account • Competitor may get Greyhound account • Loss of market share by not pursuing new opportunities Recommendations

It is recommended that Phil Hart pursue alternative #3 – Make a presentation to convince Greyhound that product placement on the TV serial “Canadian Idol” was the right promotional vehicle for their needs. Using Canadian Idol as the platform for product placement presents the best option as it meets most of Greyhound’s needs. Greyhound buses will transport contestants from location to location and the placement would seamlessly integrate in the show. Product placement of the Greyhound brand will enable viewers of the show to see Greyhound brand as opposed to traditional advertising in commercials which can be ignored by viewers. Canadian Idol has a viewer ship of 1,425,000, which is the highest amongst English Canadian television programs.

Canadian Idol is a well-established show with measurable viewer ship. Viewers of this show cross all age groups and would fall within the target segment of 18-44 both male and female. The facts and data reflecting the success of the show can be a great tool to assure Paul regarding his concerns of measuring the effectiveness of product placement. The show will be telecast nationally, which aligns with Greyhound market demographics with an actual placement value of $15,000 with a cost of only $10,000 for a 30 second spot. Product placement compares favourably with traditional commercials in this regard and would align with the overall marketing plan for Greyhound.

Alternative #1 – Make a presentation to convince Greyhound that product placement on the TV serial “Making the Cut” was the right promotional vehicle for their needs is not recommended because of the uncertainties surrounding the show. Making the Cut is a brand new series and is expected to align with Greyhound’s target age demographic. However, since it is a new program there is no historical viewer ship data that can be used to measure the potential viewer ship for this program. Male viewers are more likely to watch a reality program on hockey; female target market may not be exposed to the brand placement. There is also the risk that the show will perform poorly and product placement will not be beneficial with loss of viewer ship. This could dent the reputation of MMI for making a poor recommendation for product placement.

Using “Making the Cut” as a product placement choice can be a contingency plan, as it will be at a much lower cost and much more exposure, enough to convince Paul especially if cost is the issue. Alternative #2 – Make a presentation to convince Greyhound that product placement on the TV serial “Corner Gas” was the right promotional vehicle for their needs is not recommended, as the viewer ship is less than that of Canadian Idol. The show will be telecast nationally; however the product placement may not integrate seamlessly with the program. While the value of an actual placement is $21,000 the actual cost for a 30 second spot is $14,000, which is more than that of Canadian Idol.

Product placement does not compare favourably with traditional commercials in this regard and will not align with the overall marketing plan for Greyhound. Alternative #4 – Status quo: Don’t pursue Greyhound was not chosen because MMI has much to gain by getting Greyhound as a client. Successful product placement of Greyhound opens new avenues of potential revenues by way of leveraged licensing fee. The business thrives on personal relationships and Greyhound may also be happy to refer MMI to their business contacts. By convincing Greyhound of the benefits of product placement and successfully executing the placement, opportunities for additional placements with Laidlaw Group would become available. Action Plan Date |Item |Description | |Immediately (Aug 2005) |Meeting with MMI team |Phil Hart to organize a meeting with his team and | | | |instruct them to compile all the facts available | | | |or made available regarding two shows Canadian | | | |Idol and Making the cut. | | | | | | |Phil Hart to prepare proposals with all detailed | | | |information like historical facts, future trends,| | | |costs, integration of Greyhound in the show etc. | | | |for Canadian Idol & Making the cut.

He must | |Immediately (Aug 2005) |Proposal |highlight the increasing trend and advantages of | | | |product placement vs. traditional advertising. | | | |Based on the information compiled for each show | | | |and determining the work involved for MMI, Phil | |Immediately (Aug 2005) |Pricing |needs to decide on the retainer fees to be | | | |proposed to Greyhound. |Week 1 (Aug 2005) |Meeting with Paul Dillon and the Greyhound |Phil presents his proposal to Paul and the | | |marketing team |marketing team, acquaints him of the trend and | | | |advantages of product placement. Listens, educates| | | |and assures them about their concerns with their | | | |PQS data, cost benefit analysis and other details. | | | |Discuss the pros & cons of placing the product in | | | |either Canadian Idol or Making the Cut.

Request | | | |their feedback on the proposal made in the meeting| | | |or later within a short time. | |1 week (Dec 2007) |Client’ Decision |If Greyhound accepts the proposal made by Phil, | | | |then both agree on the cost, timelines and future | | | |action plan. Action plan discussed, decided and | | | |documented.

If not, then thank them for their time| | | |and wish them good luck with their traditional | | | |advertisement. Be in touch in future just in case…| | | | | | |Meeting with people related to the show |Based on the outcome of the above meeting, Phil | | |(producers, directors and art departments) |organizes a meeting with the eople related with | | | |the show to discuss the details of the product | |2 weeks (Sep 2005) | |placement of Greyhound. | | | | | |3-4 weeks (Sep 2005) |Meeting with Greyhound |Phil to meet with Greyhound team to further | | | |discuss the details of placement strategy decided | | | |with the production teams of the show.

Feedback | | | |from client solicited, revisions made if required | | | |on client’s solicitation. | | | |MMI to coordinate between the client and the | | |Coordination |production house on a continuous basis, giving | |6-8 weeks (Nov 2005) | |updates and feedbacks to the client regarding the | | | |progress. | | |Assuming the show is aired in December, MMI needs | |9-10 weeks (Dec 2005) | |to be in continuous follow up with the production | | |Show Aired |house and collect all kinds of data related to | | | |viewership and success/failure of the show. | | | |Evaluation of the viewership & demographics | | | |statistics done in middle of the show, Feedback | |16 -18 weeks (March 2006) |Evaluation & Feedbacks |from client solicited. | | |Evaluation of the overall experience, discuss the | | | |progress in details and acquaint Paul & the team | |End of show |Final Deliverables |of the results. If the client’s expectations met | | | |then organize a party. Receive full payment, and | | | |discuss future placement plans. | | |Maintain relationship with Greyhound continuously | |Long Term | |advising them about product placement | | |Relationship |opportunities. | Contingency Paul Dillon and the Greyhound marketing team do not accept alternative 3, and then proposal for alternative 1 “Making the Cut” should be offered. The all-Canadian show is scheduled to premiere nationally during week-end prime time. The need to transport these players to and from various venues will provide an opportunity to integrate a Greyhound bus into each episode.

The great advantage about going with the show is that within the show, the Greyhound bus is expected to feature prominently an average of three times per episode for approximately 45 seconds each time. Hockey is popular with the 18 to 44 age group which is the target group of Greyhound. Besides, as it is a new show with uncertain viewer ship, cost can be negotiated with the producer/director of the show. [pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic][pic] ———————– Divisions in Large Ad Agencies Mom & Pop Agencies Production Companies Brand Managers Independent Placement Agencies Low Quality of Service High Quality of Service High Price Low Price MM1